daily-tumbles:

johnnnnnnnn:
average intelligence of the YouTube community 
You have to follow this blog, it’s amazing

daily-tumbles:

johnnnnnnnn:

average intelligence of the YouTube community 

You have to follow this blog, it’s amazing

(via lulz-time)






justinrampage:

The IT Crowd teams up in this geeky pile of memorable items / quotes thanks to Tom Trager and his new shirt design. On sale now at RedBubble.
More awesome shirts by Tom can be found here.
The IT Crowd Crest by Tom Trager (Facebook) (Twitter)
Via: tomtrager

justinrampage:

The IT Crowd teams up in this geeky pile of memorable items / quotes thanks to Tom Trager and his new shirt design. On sale now at RedBubble.

More awesome shirts by Tom can be found here.

The IT Crowd Crest by Tom Trager (Facebook) (Twitter)

Via: tomtrager


agentmlovestacos:

JEDI KITTENS!

Via thefrogman:

[video]



(via hellakb)


astonishinglyawesome:

This is pretty much my life

astonishinglyawesome:

This is pretty much my life

(via astonishinglyawesome)


adsertoris:

A view of the “Spire” within M16, the Eagle Nebula.

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The Eagle Nebula (catalogued as Messier 16 or M16, and as NGC 6611) is a young open cluster of stars in the constellation Serpens, discovered by Jean-Philippe de Cheseaux in 1745-46. Its name derives from its shape which is resemblant of an eagle. It is the subject of the famous “Pillars of Creation” photograph by the Hubble Space Telescope, which shows pillars of star-forming gas and dust within the nebula.

The Eagle Nebula is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 6,500 light-years distant. The tower of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula is approximately 100 trillion km (60 trillion miles) high.

The brightest star in the nebula has an apparent magnitude of +8.24, easily visible with good binoculars.

Notable features: 5.5 million years old

Other designations Messier 16, NGC 6611, Sharpless 49, RCW 165, Gum 83

See also: Diffuse nebula, Lists of nebulae

Stars in the Eagle Nebula are born in clouds of cold hydrogen gas that reside in chaotic neighbourhoods, where energy from young stars sculpts fantasy-like landscapes in the gas. The tower may be a giant incubator for those newborn stars. A torrent of ultraviolet light from a band of massive, hot, young stars [off the top of the image] is eroding the pillar.

The starlight also is responsible for illuminating the tower’s rough surface. Ghostly streamers of gas can be seen boiling off this surface, creating the haze around the structure and highlighting its three-dimensional shape. The column is silhouetted against the background glow of more distant gas.

The edge of the dark hydrogen cloud at the top of the tower is resisting erosion, in a manner similar to that of brush among a field of prairie grass that is being swept up by fire. The fire quickly burns the grass but slows down when it encounters the dense brush. In this celestial case, thick clouds of hydrogen gas and dust have survived longer than their surroundings in the face of a blast of ultraviolet light from the hot, young stars.

Inside the gaseous tower, stars may be forming. Some of those stars may have been created by dense gas collapsing under gravity. Other stars may be forming due to pressure from gas that has been heated by the neighbouring hot stars.

The first wave of stars may have started forming before the massive star cluster began venting its scorching light. The star birth may have begun when denser regions of cold gas within the tower started collapsing under their own weight to make stars.

The bumps and fingers of material in the centre of the tower are examples of these stellar birthing areas. These regions may look small but they are roughly the size of our solar system. The fledgling stars continued to grow as they fed off the surrounding gas cloud. They abruptly stopped growing when light from the star cluster uncovered their gaseous cradles, separating them from their gas supply.

Ironically, the young cluster’s intense starlight may be inducing star formation in some regions of the tower. Examples can be seen in the large, glowing clumps and finger-shaped protrusions at the top of the structure. The stars may be heating the gas at the top of the tower and creating a shock front, as seen by the bright rim of material tracing the edge of the nebula at top, left. As the heated gas expands, it acts like a battering ram, pushing against the darker cold gas. The intense pressure compresses the gas, making it easier for stars to form. This scenario may continue as the shock front moves slowly down the tower.

The dominant colours in the image were produced by gas energized by the star cluster’s powerful ultraviolet light. The blue colour at the top is from glowing oxygen. The red colon in the lower region is from glowing hydrogen. The Eagle Nebula image was taken in November 2004 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

(via ilikeartalot2-deactivated201207)